?

Log in

No account? Create an account

March 2016

S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
Powered by LiveJournal.com

On re-reading HP for pleasure (part 1 of more than one?)

This posting here might cause some people to de-friend me. I am aware of this.

This posting here most probably will be one of the last items in the "public" part of this LJ-blog here. No need to weep (or to rejoice): there are still a number of places on the web where people muse about things Harry Potter.



Several months ago I started an activity unknown to me for several years: reading the HP books for pleasure, just for pleasure, for nothing but pleasure, with no other goal or agenda than finding pleasure.

It started out fine. PS was the superb book which it has been for me for years and years. CoS was far less boring than I had remembered it to be. And I rejoiced when I found a yet not underlined nor annotated "Saint Harry Potter" by Draco Malfoy, and did not underline it, nor cross reference it in the "De praesentia sive absentia deorum" section of my Pensieve.
But then: PoA. I had always liked it (though not as much as PS). But this time. Ach! Not only did the physical book disintegrate (deciding, probably, that it had been read more than often enough - and I still don't know where it keeps its brain …). Moreover: I found PoA boring. No longer fun, but very very boring. I retried it again and again. To no avail. And now I've stopped reading it, in the mid of the chapter "Snape's grudge", and for good.
And that's the end of it - at least for now. Not finding pleasure any more in reading HP: I stopped it.
These days I'm re-reading Döblin's Amazonas. Great book. And then probably Gil Blas. And then, perhaps, Moby Dick. (I gave Sherlock Holmes a chance, but somehow I didn't get into the right mood.)
Finding something like Casanova's Histoire de ma vie, but written by somebody with a sense of humour would be ideal. Any suggestions anybody?

And now you may f-cut me. Or not. It's up to you.
Tags: ,

Comments

There will be no f-cutting from me that's for sure. I had to laugh at your mini debate with Brooke on Moby Dick. That is one I have not read. Now I must to see who I agree with on that book.
I suggest The Count of Monte Cristo - always a pleasure to read that again! When I get bored I go back to short stories - Ray Bradbury, Sherwood Anderson, Eudora Welty, and Katherine Mansfield.

I admit that I've never read Moby Dick - you and Brooke will have to forgive me for that, ha.

I would never cut someone based on what they are reading - or not reading, LOL. I get burned out on books, too, and abandon them for years. I read alot of things besides Harry Potter - nonfiction, mysteries, history - and I think that's healthy.
LOL! Moby Dick! It's really surprising how many people haven't read it. In fact I didn't read it until the summer following my first year in law school.
Now I loved The Count of Monte Cristo!! This summer I would like to read more of Jules Verne and Bram Stoker. Oh and did you know there was a new posthumous Tolkien release? Well in the US anyway. Tolkien did a retelling of the Norwegian myth of Sigurd & Gurdun. If I recall the story correctly, Sigurd ingested dragon blood and gained the ability to speak to birds. It was something I looked up while trying to guess at the 12 uses of dragon's blood.

I don't intend to unfriend you. How will I learn acronyms.
Well, I certainly don't blame you for stopping reading - it's been two years since I read a HP book. Onwards and upwards!
Moby Dick is one book I mean to read sooner rather than later. No, Sherlock Holmes I've never really gotten into. I've just started reading Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children and just finished Obama's Dreams from my Father.

One book I thought might amuse you (and anyone who has ever spent some time involved in a messageboard) - The Helmet of Horror by Victor Pelevin? It's a re-telling of the myth of Theseus and the Minotaur. Though whether it's as appealing as a humourous version of Casanova's book I don't know :)
I would suggest The Book of Margery Kempe. It is an autobiography from the 15th century. She doesn't mean to be funny but succeeds in being so anyway.
One of my absolute favorite books is, believe it or not, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter Thompson. It is crazy and funny but autobiographical.
Or Stone Book Quartet by Alan Garner. Some of his other books have been really good too but this one might suit your taste more.

Thanks!

Lots of thanks to all of you for still talking to me! [:-)]
And for your suggestions!

Tags